Monday, July 16th, 2012

How to get happy at work – using books as oracles

Happy at work – the oracle

I often work intuitively with my clients with it by asking them to form a question and then turning to a page and seeing if “the oracle” has some wisdom to share

Today I asked myself: “what do I need to know today?” and the book replied: “There is no mistaking love. You feel it in your heart. It is the common fibre of life, the flame that heals our soul, energizes our spirit and supplies passion to our lives.” ~ Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, psychologist

This speaks to me on many levels – loving what I do, loving who I am with, working and living with passion. No compromises!

Here is how one of my clients used it recently:

“I have picked up your book and randomly opened onto a page – it opened on a quote: “There is no such thing as a career path anymore – it’s crazy paving and you lay it yourself”   This quote emulates my feelings, I feel like I have no idea where I am going, where I want to be or how I am going to get there.” ~ Trish
This lead to productive session about ways to ‘create’ and bring into being more clarity about what Trish needs and wants in a role.

Will be interested in what the book says to you. If you don’t already have a copy:

Happy at Work for mid-lifers +

An inspiring and practical book guaranteed to rekindle your passion for work and life $55 NZD + pp

http://www.worklifesolutions.co.nz/shop/happy-at-work-for-mid-lifers

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Sunday, July 15th, 2012

Dream then do

As always my friend Kenn Butler’s weekly newsletter is very inspiring. You can read the full newsletter at the end of this post.

I loved it all – especially the following excerpts:

George Lucas, creator & producer of the Star Wars movies, says the one thing which kept him & his colleagues going during the difficult times was this: ‘We were always dreaming of how it was going to be’. There is also the story about a student riding a bicycle on a college campus. On his t-shirt was the message: ‘I am going to be a doctor’. On the byke was a sign which also had a message: ‘I am going to be a Mercedes’. This is somebody who had learned to keep dreaming.

Andrew Carnegie, a Christian philanthropist during the early 1900s, said: ‘If you want to be happy, set a goal which commands your thoughts, liberates your energy, & inspires your hopes’. In other words – keep your dream alive & it will keep you alive.

At the end of the newsletter he asks: “how do you think you are tracking with your dreams?”

The timing couldn’t have been better. On my desk is a dream journal and the page currently open says ‘dream then do it.’

My dream is to finish and have published Mona Lisa’s Secret – my first historical work of fiction. My dream is for it to be an international best-seller, adapted for cinema which is loved and adored and brings joy and entertainment to people’s lives.

I’m tracking pretty well.  I have finished a first draft, pitched the concept to a US agent and to Penguin Publishing who have both asked for the completed full manuscript; I am currently working with a top literary editor to polish my manuscript; and I’m about to travel to Florence, Madrid, Paris and London to complete research and attend the Historical Novel Society conference.

Despite all this progress and the fantastic feedback about my novel I have received such as: “Based on what I have read I’d say your historical ‘story’ is on par with Sarah Dunant, or the ‘Girl with a Pearl Earring’ – so very publishable,”  and “Your concept for ‘Mona Lisa’ is fascinating. Superb. Your descriptions are so evocative, lively and creative with great depictions of emotion. The prose absolutely sings! I really like it and I want to read more.  I think you are onto a winner. I think its got the potential to be a blockbuster,” Kenn’s message re keeping the faith is very important as it is easy for doubt to creep in. It is such a big project and there are times I find myself saying: “Why have I made it so hard?” Why didn’t I settle for churning out contemporary romance?”

But I come back to the quote: ‘If you want to be happy, set a goal which commands your thoughts, liberates your energy, & inspires your hopes

As my partner said yesterday when I was tempted to settle: “It’s the harder thing to do. But it’s the right thing to do, and its the right thing for you because it’s what you’ve always wanted to do.”

I hope you find Kenn’s newsletter and my comments encouraging in the pursuit of your own dreams and goals.

 

Dreams Fulfilled?

Following on from last week, I suggested: All things are created twice: first in your mind, & then in your life! And, if having thought about it, any idea what the answer may be? There is usually a huge gap between the birth of a dream & achievement of the dream. Another question you have to ask yourself is whether it will be a fulfillment gap or a frustration gap. If it is the latter, you will be miserable most of the days you are in it. And, every day you are frustrated instead of fulfilled you lessen the odds you will be able to keep moving forward toward your dream.

Author Seth Godin calls this gap between when you set out to do something & when you start to see significant results ‘the dip’. The dip represents the adversity you must face, the learning curve you must go through & the hard work you must be willing to invest between conception & realization. If the dip you are in seems to be a road without end, don’t be impatient or throw away your confidence; keep travelling steadily & persevere. So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, for this is temporary; but what is unseen.

Consultant Dan Sullivan talks about the difference between our ‘ideals’ & our ‘actuals’. He says, ‘The ideal picture we create of future desirable events & situations enables us to move forward in time. The ideal does not actually exist outside our minds. Nor is it achievable’. Why? Because it depends on everything being perfect. Life is, at best, messy. It is filled with surprises – both bad & good. If you need an ideal picture of your dream to come into being in order to feel fulfilled, it will never happen. This does not mean you should cast aside your ideal vision.

It is useful for assisting to establish goals, to find internal motivation & strive for excellence. However, you also need to temper it. Where idealistic dreams expect to be realised immediately, realistic dreams make you appreciate the time it takes for them to become a reality. Where idealistic dreams do not tolerate anything less than perfection, realistic dreams leave room for you to be human & imperfect. Where idealistic dreams set you up for disappointment, realistic dreams set you up for success.

To keep a dream alive & in the pursuit of it, you must allow yourself to keep dreaming & intuitively understand the process provides inspiration, motivation & fulfillment. George Lucas, creator & producer of the Star Wars movies, says the one thing which kept him & his colleagues going during the difficult times was this: ‘We were always dreaming of how it was going to be’. There is also the story about a student riding a bicycle on a college campus. On his t-shirt was the message: ‘I am going to be a doctor’. On the byke was a sign which also had a message: ‘I am going to be a Mercedes’. This is somebody who had learned to keep dreaming.

Andrew Carnegie, a Christian philanthropist during the early 1900s, said: ‘If you want to be happy, set a goal which commands your thoughts, liberates your energy, & inspires your hopes’. In other words – keep your dream alive & it will keep you alive.

As I concluded last week: ‘What needs to be done?’ The future belongs to those who have the courage to ask, make the enquiries & the faith to hang in until they discover the answer. So, how do you think you are tracking with your dreams again?

www.kennbutler.com

[1]



[1] [1] Bob Gass is an American-based former Christian pastor, broadcaster & author of several books who was raised in Northern Ireland. He writes    a daily devotional, called The Word for Today which has a circulation of over one million copies quarterly. This weeks issue has been adapted from the Word for Today Reflections this quarter – May – July 2012.

 

Tags: , , , , ,